Posts Tagged Charity

Volunteer Charity Work

Volunteer Charity Work

Charity Volunteer Work can even be that you are willing to help a present or potential employer recruit volunteers. This is such a great step in the right direction!

Doing Charity Work is like being an intern. You raise your awareness plus you are raising your knowledge while increasing your experience. You might not get green paper in return for your efforts but you gain a lot. You not only gain experience and Knowledge, but having this hands on experience is looked upon like being book smart. It shows that you are out there applying yourself. Charity work can really get you ahead of the others. Showing that you are willing to spend your free time doing something worthwhile says a lot about you and who you are.

From my own personal experience I know that “No Experience Necessary” is invisible ink for ‘two years’ of hands on experience.

So don’t ever count it out. Add Charity Volunteer Work to your Resume. Also any list of personal references can include people you dealt with and worked with while Doing Charity Volunteer work.

Some places do state that the person cannot be a Relative for a personal reference. The above suggestions would work for such a place. This will enhance your List.

Although some places do state that you need to have known the person for a minimal amount of time in order to be able to list them. In which case I would list a neighbor or a relative. Long term friends can count as well. Also if you have worked more than one Charity event but it has been with the same organization, list those with whom you interacted with during this time.

Many charities are looking for help in the office, raising money, out in the field, publishing their work and working with local agencies such as government. You can help in all of these areas. Just make sure they know that you also want payment as soon as a position becomes available.

You should never forget how tough it is for any philanthropic organization to get money. Getting money into the charity is tough. Which makes it look even better on your part that you are willing to help.

It’s FREE to help. Help you help yourself.

Volunteering for Charity, Legally

Volunteering for Charity, Legally

Charities are often required to rely on the kindness of volunteers in order to carry out the work they are doing, however, as a charity this can often be a source of some confusion about how to treat a volunteer in terms of “legal employment”. As a volunteer giving up your precious time in order to contribute, you may also want to know where your legal boundaries lie. The following is an overview of some of the most frequently asked questions regarding charity and differentiating between the rights of employees and the rights of volunteers.

Does a charity need a formal contract with a volunteer?

The answer to this is no, so long as you are strictly a volunteer, giving of your time freely for your chosen cause. However, if you are an employee of a charity, a formal document is needed, much like any other job.

Regarding volunteer work, a charity must realize that there is no obligation on behalf of volunteers, nor can they place any obligation on them.

The furthest a charity is able to go in terms of drawing up an agreement with volunteers is to communicate hopes and expectations rather than any kind of key requirements. Simply put, volunteers are not employees and the work to do is up to their own discretion.

 How should a charity tackle a volunteer in terms of disciplinary problems?

Again, a volunteer is not an employee and disciplinary issues should be approached with the word “voluntary” in mind. In other words, these are not employees and this means that a charity’s procedures should be tailored accordingly. Legally, a charity can not create obligation for a volunteer to attend work and should rather come up with alternative arrangements and schedules for volunteers who are repeated “no-shows”. Terms such as “disciplinary action” should be avoided.

Should a charity pay a volunteer?

Absolutely not, because the moment a charity remunerates a volunteer, the work is no longer voluntary and volunteers suddenly become “employees”, along with any legal implications this brings with it.

Should a charity at least pay expenses?

Reimbursing volunteers for expenses is fine, so long as they are only replacing money that the volunteer has actually spent out of their own pocket, as a direct result of the volunteer work.

If volunteers aren’t seen as employees, then does a charity need to make provision in terms of insurance?

The answer to this is yes, most definitely. It is quite important that a charity notifies insurers that volunteers are working at the charity. This is just to ensure that the charity is covered in the event that a volunteer is injured whilst working, and to protect the charity against claims that may come about if a volunteer behaves negligently whilst working for the charity.

So hopefully that clarified a few of the ins and outs in terms of volunteering for charitiesin the legal sense. The best approach to have as a charity and volunteer is mutual respect and to never lose sight of why you are both there in the first place- to work towards a bigger cause!